email editorial – Free Bassuk http://freebassuk.com/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 08:48:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://freebassuk.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon.png email editorial – Free Bassuk http://freebassuk.com/ 32 32 Tekmar Group (LON:TGP) makes moderate use of debt https://freebassuk.com/tekmar-group-lontgp-makes-moderate-use-of-debt/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 07:47:08 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/tekmar-group-lontgp-makes-moderate-use-of-debt/ Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett said “volatility is far from synonymous with risk.” So it may be obvious that you need to take debt into account when thinking about the risk of a given stock, because too much debt can […]]]>

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett said “volatility is far from synonymous with risk.” So it may be obvious that you need to take debt into account when thinking about the risk of a given stock, because too much debt can sink a business. We can see that Tekmar Group plc (LON:TGP) uses debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt makes the business risky.

What risk does debt carry?

Debt helps a business until the business struggles to pay it back, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. Although not too common, we often see companies in debt permanently diluting their shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a ridiculous price. Of course, the advantage of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a business with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we think about a company’s use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Discover our latest analysis for Tekmar Group

What is the net debt of the Tekmar group?

As you can see below, at the end of September 2021, the Tekmar Group had a debt of £6.05m, up from £3.00m a year ago. Click on the image for more details. On the other hand, he has £3.48m in cash, resulting in a net debt of around £2.57m.

AIM: TGP Debt to Equity History March 9, 2022

A look at the liabilities of the Tekmar group

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that the Tekmar group had liabilities of £12.5m due within a year, and liabilities of £3.65m due beyond . As compensation for these obligations, it had cash of £3.48 million as well as receivables valued at £17.4 million maturing within 12 months. Thus, he can boast that he has £4.68 million more in liquid assets than total Passives.

This excess liquidity suggests that the Tekmar group is taking a cautious approach to debt. Given that he has easily sufficient short-term cash, we don’t think he will have any problems with his lenders. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, the company’s future profitability will decide whether the Tekmar Group can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you are focused on the future, you can check out this free report showing analyst earnings forecast.

Last year, the Tekmar Group recorded a loss before interest and tax and actually cut its revenue by 20%, to £31million. This is not what we hope to see.

Caveat Emptor

While Tekmar Group’s declining revenue is about as comforting as a wet blanket, arguably its loss of earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) is even less appealing. Indeed, it lost a very considerable £3.6 million in EBIT. On the plus side, the company has adequate liquid assets, giving it time to grow and expand before its debt becomes a short-term issue. Still, we would be more encouraged to study the business in depth if it already had free cash flow. This one is a little too risky for our liking. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risks reside on the balance sheet, far from it. Know that Tekmar Group shows 2 warning signs in our investment analysis you should know…

In the end, sometimes it’s easier to focus on companies that don’t even need to take on debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with no net debt 100% freeat present.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Sanlorenzo (BIT:SL) appears to be using debt sparingly https://freebassuk.com/sanlorenzo-bitsl-appears-to-be-using-debt-sparingly/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 07:34:12 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/sanlorenzo-bitsl-appears-to-be-using-debt-sparingly/ Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger-backed outside fund manager Li Lu is quick to say, “The biggest risk in investing isn’t price volatility, but whether you’re going to suffer a permanent loss of capital “. It’s natural to consider a company’s balance sheet when looking at its riskiness, as debt is often involved when a company fails. […]]]>

Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger-backed outside fund manager Li Lu is quick to say, “The biggest risk in investing isn’t price volatility, but whether you’re going to suffer a permanent loss of capital “. It’s natural to consider a company’s balance sheet when looking at its riskiness, as debt is often involved when a company fails. We note that Sanlorenzo Spa (BIT:SL) has debt on its balance sheet. But should shareholders worry about its use of debt?

When is debt dangerous?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily meet those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company cannot meet its legal debt repayment obligations, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity at a low price, thereby permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, especially capital-intensive businesses. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business has is to look at its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Sanlorenzo

What is Sanlorenzo’s debt?

You can click on the chart below for historical figures, but it shows Sanlorenzo had €100.9m in debt in September 2021, up from €106.6m a year earlier. However, he has €139.1m in cash which offsets this, leading to a net cash of €38.3m.

BIT:SL Debt to Equity March 5, 2022

How strong is Sanlorenzo’s balance sheet?

According to the last published balance sheet, Sanlorenzo had liabilities of €265.5 million maturing within 12 months and liabilities of €76.3 million maturing beyond 12 months. In return for these obligations, it had cash of €139.1 million as well as receivables worth €125.6 million at less than 12 months. Thus, its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (short-term) receivables by €77.1 million.

Given that Sanlorenzo has a market capitalization of €1.11 billion, it’s hard to believe that these liabilities pose a big threat. But there are enough liabilities that we certainly recommend that shareholders continue to monitor the balance sheet in the future. Despite its notable liabilities, Sanlorenzo has a net cash position, so it’s fair to say that it’s not heavily leveraged!

On top of that, we are pleased to report that Sanlorenzo increased its EBIT by 76%, reducing the specter of future debt repayments. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when analyzing debt. But ultimately, the company’s future profitability will decide whether Sanlorenzo can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you are focused on the future, you can check out this free report showing analyst earnings forecast.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off its debts; book profits are not enough. Sanlorenzo may have net cash on the balance sheet, but it’s always interesting to see how well the company converts its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) into free cash flow, as this will influence both its need and its ability to manage debt. Over the past three years, Sanlorenzo has recorded a free cash flow of 47% of its EBIT, which is lower than expected. It’s not great when it comes to paying off debt.

Abstract

While it is always a good idea to look at a company’s total liabilities, it is very reassuring that Sanlorenzo has 38.3 million euros in net cash. And we liked the look of EBIT growth of 76% YoY last year. So is Sanlorenzo’s debt a risk? This does not seem to us to be the case. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risks reside on the balance sheet, far from it. Example: we have identified 2 warning signs for Sanlorenzo you should be aware.

If, after all that, you’re more interested in a fast-growing company with a strong balance sheet, check out our list of cash-neutral growth stocks right away.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Famous brands (JSE:FBR) could risk shrinking as a business https://freebassuk.com/famous-brands-jsefbr-could-risk-shrinking-as-a-business/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 06:20:12 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/famous-brands-jsefbr-could-risk-shrinking-as-a-business/ When researching a stock for investment purposes, what can tell us that the company is in decline? More often than not we will see a decline to return to on capital employed (ROCE) and a decrease amount capital employed. This reveals that the company is not increasing shareholder wealth because returns are falling and its […]]]>

When researching a stock for investment purposes, what can tell us that the company is in decline? More often than not we will see a decline to return to on capital employed (ROCE) and a decrease amount capital employed. This reveals that the company is not increasing shareholder wealth because returns are falling and its net asset base is shrinking. And from a first reading, things don’t look very good to Famous brands (JSE:FBR), so let’s see why.

Understanding return on capital employed (ROCE)

Just to clarify if you’re not sure, ROCE is a measure of the pre-tax income (as a percentage) that a business earns on the capital invested in its business. Analysts use this formula to calculate it for famous brands:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets – Current Liabilities)

0.29 = R626m ÷ (R3.0b – R835m) (Based on the last twelve months to August 2021).

So, Famous Brands has a ROCE of 29%. In absolute terms, this is an excellent return and is even better than the hotel industry average of 7.2%.

Check out our latest analysis for famous brands

JSE:FBR Return on Capital Employed February 25, 2022

Historical performance is a great starting point when researching a stock. So above you can see the Famous Brands ROCE gauge compared to its past returns. If you want to see how Famous Brands have performed in the past in other metrics, you can check out this free chart of past profits, revenue and cash flow.

What can we say about the ROCE trend of famous brands?

Caution should be exercised with famous brands, as yields are on the decline. To be more precise, the ROCE was 43% five years ago, but since then it has fallen significantly. In addition to this, it should be noted that the amount of capital used within the company remained relatively stable. Companies that exhibit these attributes tend not to shrink, but they can be mature and face pressure on their margins from the competition. If these trends continue, we don’t expect Famous Brands to turn into a multi-bagger.

Similarly, Famous Brands reduced its current liabilities to 28% of total assets. This could partly explain why ROCE fell. Additionally, it may reduce some aspects of risk to the business, as the business’s suppliers or short-term creditors now fund less of its operations. Since the company is essentially funding more of its operations with its own money, one could argue that this has made the company less efficient at generating a return on investment.

In conclusion…

In summary, it is unfortunate that Famous Brands generates lower returns from the same amount of capital. It’s no surprise, then, that the stock has fallen 54% in the past five years, so it seems investors are acknowledging these changes. That being the case, unless the underlying trends return to a more positive trajectory, we would consider looking elsewhere.

If you want to know some of the risks famous brands face, we found 3 warning signs (2 are a bit of a concern!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

Famous Brands is not the only stock to generate high returns. If you want to see more, check out our free list of companies with high returns on equity with strong fundamentals.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Does Petrus Resources (TSE:PRQ) have a healthy balance sheet? https://freebassuk.com/does-petrus-resources-tseprq-have-a-healthy-balance-sheet/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 14:42:15 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/does-petrus-resources-tseprq-have-a-healthy-balance-sheet/ Howard Marks said it well when he said that, rather than worrying about stock price volatility, “the possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about…and that every practical investor that I know is worried”. So it seems smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very […]]]>

Howard Marks said it well when he said that, rather than worrying about stock price volatility, “the possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about…and that every practical investor that I know is worried”. So it seems smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor when you’re assessing a company’s risk. We can see that Petrus Resources Ltd. (TSE:PRQ) uses debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt makes the business risky.

What risk does debt carry?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company cannot easily repay it, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. An integral part of capitalism is the process of “creative destruction” where bankrupt companies are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. Although not too common, we often see companies in debt permanently diluting their shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a ridiculous price. Of course, the advantage of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a business with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we think about a company’s use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Discover our latest analysis for Petrus Resources

What is Petrus Resources net debt?

As you can see below, Petrus Resources had C$59.5 million in debt as of September 2021, up from C$115.8 million the previous year. On the other hand, it has C$1.51 million in cash, resulting in a net debt of approximately C$58.0 million.

TSX:PRQ Debt to Equity Historical February 20, 2022

A look at the liabilities of Petrus Resources

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Petrus Resources had liabilities of C$79.5 million due within 12 months and liabilities of C$40.2 million due beyond. On the other hand, it had liquid assets of 1.51 million Canadian dollars and 9.16 million Canadian dollars of receivables due within one year. Thus, its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (current) receivables of C$109.0 million.

This deficit is considerable compared to its market capitalization of 149.2 million Canadian dollars, so it suggests that shareholders monitor the use of debt by Petrus Resources. If its lenders asked it to shore up its balance sheet, shareholders would likely face significant dilution.

In order to assess a company’s debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) divided by its expenses. interest (its interest coverage). In this way, we consider both the absolute amount of debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Even though Petrus Resources’ debt is only 2.2, its interest coverage is really very low at 0.27. The main reason for this is that it has such high depreciation and amortization. These fees may be non-monetary, so they could be excluded when it comes to repaying the debt. But accounting fees are there for a reason: some assets seem to lose value. Either way, it’s safe to say that the company has significant debt. Notably, Petrus Resources recorded a loss in EBIT last year, but improved it to a positive EBIT of C$2.6 million over the last twelve months. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. But you can’t look at debt in total isolation; since Petrus Resources will need revenue to repay this debt. So, if you want to know more about its earnings, it might be worth checking out this graph of its long-term trend.

Finally, while the taxman may love accounting profits, lenders only accept cash. It is therefore important to check how much of its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) converts into actual free cash flow. Fortunately for all shareholders, Petrus Resources has actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT over the past year. This kind of high cash conversion gets us as excited as the crowd when the beat drops at a Daft Punk concert.

Our point of view

Neither the ability of Petrus Resources to cover its interest charges with its EBIT nor its level of total liabilities gave us confidence in its ability to take on more debt. But the good news is that it seems to be able to easily convert EBIT to free cash flow. We think Petrus Resources’ debt makes it a bit risky, after looking at the aforementioned data points together. Not all risk is bad, as it can increase stock price returns if it pays off, but this leverage risk is worth keeping in mind. When analyzing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious starting point. But at the end of the day, every business can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. Be aware that Petrus Resources displays 2 warning signs in our investment analysis and 1 of them does not suit us too much…

Of course, if you’re the type of investor who prefers to buy stocks without the burden of debt, then feel free to check out our exclusive list of cash-efficient growth stocks today.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Parsvnath Developers (NSE:PARSVNATH) seems to use a lot of debt https://freebassuk.com/parsvnath-developers-nseparsvnath-seems-to-use-a-lot-of-debt/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 02:53:23 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/parsvnath-developers-nseparsvnath-seems-to-use-a-lot-of-debt/ Legendary fund manager Li Lu (whom Charlie Munger once backed) once said, “The greatest risk in investing is not price volatility, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital. It’s natural to consider a company’s balance sheet when looking at its riskiness, as debt is often involved when a company fails. We note […]]]>

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (whom Charlie Munger once backed) once said, “The greatest risk in investing is not price volatility, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital. It’s natural to consider a company’s balance sheet when looking at its riskiness, as debt is often involved when a company fails. We note that Parsvnath Developers Limited (NSE:PARSVNATH) has debt on its balance sheet. But does this debt worry shareholders?

What risk does debt carry?

Debt helps a business until the business struggles to pay it back, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Ultimately, if the company cannot meet its legal debt repayment obligations, shareholders could walk away with nothing. Although not too common, we often see companies in debt permanently diluting their shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a ridiculous price. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, especially capital-intensive businesses. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business has is to look at its cash flow and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Parsvnath Developers

What is Parsvnath Developers net debt?

You can click on the graph below for historical figures, but it shows that as of September 2021, Parsvnath developers had ₹36.4 billion in debt, an increase from ₹30.1 billion, on a year. On the other hand, he has ₹1.05 billion in cash, resulting in a net debt of around ₹35.4 billion.

NSEI: PARSVNATH Debt to Equity History February 19, 2022

A Look at the Responsibilities of Parsvnath Developers

According to the latest published balance sheet, Parsvnath Developers had liabilities of ₹52.0 billion due within 12 months and liabilities of ₹26.0 billion due beyond 12 months. As compensation for these obligations, it had cash of ₹1.05 billion as well as receivables valued at ₹2.91 billion due within 12 months. Thus, its liabilities total ₹74.1 billion more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit casts a shadow over the ₹7.18 billion society, like a colossus towering above mere mortals. So we definitely think shareholders need to watch this one closely. Ultimately, Parsvnath Developers would likely need a major recapitalization if its creditors were to demand repayment.

We measure a company’s leverage against its earning power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and calculating how easily its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT ) covers its interest charge (interest coverage). Thus, we consider debt to earnings with and without amortization and depreciation expense.

Low interest coverage of 0.11x and an extremely high net debt to EBITDA ratio of 54.6 shook our confidence in Parsvnath Developers like a punch in the gut. This means that we would consider him to be heavily indebted. Worse still, Parsvnath Developers has seen its EBIT soar to 26% over the past 12 months. If profits continue like this in the long term, there is an unimaginable chance of repaying this debt. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. But you can’t look at debt in total isolation; since Parsvnath Developers will need revenue to repay this debt. So, when considering debt, it is definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive preview.

Finally, while the taxman may love accounting profits, lenders only accept cash. We must therefore clearly examine whether this EBIT generates a corresponding free cash flow. Over the past two years, Parsvnath Developers has actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT. This kind of strong cash generation warms our hearts like a puppy in a bumblebee suit.

Our point of view

To be frank, Parsvnath Developers’ EBIT growth rate and track record of keeping total liabilities under control makes us rather uncomfortable with its level of leverage. But on the bright side, its conversion from EBIT to free cash flow is a good sign and makes us more optimistic. Considering all the above factors, it seems that Parsvnath Developers has too much debt. That kind of risk is acceptable to some, but it certainly doesn’t float our boat. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when analyzing debt. But at the end of the day, every business can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example Parsvnath Developers has 3 warning signs (and 1 which is significant) that we think you should know about.

Of course, if you’re the type of investor who prefers to buy stocks without the burden of debt, then feel free to check out our exclusive list of cash-efficient growth stocks today.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Ilex Medical (TLV:ILX) could easily take on more debt https://freebassuk.com/ilex-medical-tlvilx-could-easily-take-on-more-debt/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 04:25:01 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/ilex-medical-tlvilx-could-easily-take-on-more-debt/ Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger-backed outside fund manager Li Lu is quick to say, “The biggest risk in investing isn’t price volatility, but whether you’re going to suffer a permanent loss of capital “. It’s natural to consider a company’s balance sheet when looking at its riskiness, as debt is often involved when a company fails. […]]]>

Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger-backed outside fund manager Li Lu is quick to say, “The biggest risk in investing isn’t price volatility, but whether you’re going to suffer a permanent loss of capital “. It’s natural to consider a company’s balance sheet when looking at its riskiness, as debt is often involved when a company fails. We can see that Ilex Medical Ltd (TLV:ILX) uses debt in its business. But does this debt worry shareholders?

Why is debt risky?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company cannot easily repay it, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. In the worst case, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity at a low price, thereby permanently diluting shareholders. By replacing dilution, however, debt can be a great tool for companies that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company’s use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Discover our latest analysis for Ilex Medical

What is Ilex Medical’s net debt?

You can click on the graph below for historical figures, but it shows that Ilex Medical had a debt of ₪6.09 million in September 2021, compared to ₪26.8 million a year before. However, he has ₪192.8 million in cash to offset this, resulting in a net cash of ₪186.7 million.

TASE: ILX Debt to Equity February 14, 2022

A look at Ilex Medical’s responsibilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Ilex Medical had liabilities of £267.7m due within a year, and liabilities of £59.7m due beyond . In return, he had ₪192.8 million in cash and ₪300.0 million in debt due within 12 months. He can therefore boast of having 165.4 million more liquid assets than total Passives.

This surplus suggests that Ilex Medical has a conservative balance sheet, and could probably deleverage without much difficulty. Simply put, the fact that Ilex Medical has more cash than debt is arguably a good indication that it can safely manage its debt.

On top of that, we are pleased to report that Ilex Medical increased its EBIT by 65%, reducing the specter of future debt repayments. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is Ilex Medical’s results that will influence the balance sheet in the future. So, when considering debt, it is definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive preview.

Finally, a company can only repay its debts with cash, not book profits. Ilex Medical may have net cash on the balance sheet, but it is always interesting to see how well the company converts its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) into free cash flow, as this will influence both its need and its capacity. . to manage debt. Over the past three years, Ilex Medical has produced strong free cash flow equivalent to 69% of its EBIT, which is what we expected. This cold hard cash allows him to reduce his debt whenever he wants.

Summary

While we sympathize with investors who find debt a concern, you should bear in mind that Ilex Medical has a net cash position of ₪186.7 million, as well as more liquid assets than liabilities. And it has impressed us with its 65% EBIT growth over the past year. Is Ilex Medical’s debt then a risk? This does not seem to us to be the case. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when analyzing debt. But at the end of the day, every business can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example – Ilex Medical has 1 warning sign we think you should know.

Of course, if you’re the type of investor who prefers to buy stocks without the burden of debt, then feel free to check out our exclusive list of cash-efficient growth stocks today.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Alliance Data Systems (NYSE:ADS) has a somewhat stretched balance sheet https://freebassuk.com/alliance-data-systems-nyseads-has-a-somewhat-stretched-balance-sheet/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 12:10:32 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/alliance-data-systems-nyseads-has-a-somewhat-stretched-balance-sheet/ Howard Marks said it well when he said that, rather than worrying about stock price volatility, “the possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about…and that every practical investor that I know is worried”. So it may be obvious that you need to take debt into account when thinking about the risk of […]]]>

Howard Marks said it well when he said that, rather than worrying about stock price volatility, “the possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about…and that every practical investor that I know is worried”. So it may be obvious that you need to take debt into account when thinking about the risk of a given stock, because too much debt can sink a business. Above all, Alliance Data Systems Corporation (NYSE:ADS) is in debt. But does this debt worry shareholders?

What risk does debt carry?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily meet those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company cannot meet its legal debt repayment obligations, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still costly) situation is when a company has to dilute shareholders at a cheap share price just to keep debt under control. That said, the most common situation is when a company manages its debt reasonably well – and to its own benefit. When we think about a company’s use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Alliance Data Systems

What is Alliance Data Systems’ net debt?

As you can see below, Alliance Data Systems had $18.5 billion in debt as of December 2021, roughly the same as the year before. You can click on the graph for more details. On the other hand, it has $3.05 billion in cash, resulting in a net debt of around $15.4 billion.

NYSE: Historical Debt to Equity ADS February 5, 2022

How healthy is Alliance Data Systems’ balance sheet?

According to the last published balance sheet, Alliance Data Systems had liabilities of US$4.00 million due within 12 months and liabilities of US$19.7 billion due beyond 12 months. In return, he had $3.05 billion in cash and $371.5 million in receivables due within 12 months. It therefore has liabilities totaling $16.2 billion more than its cash and short-term receivables, combined.

This deficit casts a shadow over the $3.45 billion company, like a colossus towering above mere mortals. We would therefore be watching his balance sheet closely, no doubt. Ultimately, Alliance Data Systems would likely need a major recapitalization if its creditors were to demand repayment.

We measure a company’s leverage against its earning power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and calculating how easily its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT ) covers its interest charge (interest coverage). In this way, we consider both the absolute amount of debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Alliance Data Systems’ net debt to EBITDA ratio is 13.2, suggesting rather high debt levels, but its interest coverage of 8.9 times suggests debt is easily repaid. Overall, we’d say it seems likely that the company is carrying quite a heavy debt load. It should be noted that Alliance Data Systems’ EBIT has surged like bamboo after rain, gaining 92% over the last twelve months. This will make it easier to manage your debt. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Alliance Data Systems’ ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet in the future. So if you are focused on the future, you can check out this free report showing analyst earnings forecast.

But our last consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; he needs cash. It is therefore worth checking how much of this EBIT is supported by free cash flow. Fortunately for all shareholders, Alliance Data Systems has actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT for the past three years. There’s nothing better than incoming money to stay in the good books of your lenders.

Our point of view

We feel some trepidation about the difficulty level of Alliance Data Systems’ total passive, but we also have some positives to focus on. The EBIT to free cash flow conversion and the EBIT growth rate were encouraging signs. We think Alliance Data Systems’ debt makes it a bit risky, after looking at the aforementioned data points together. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, since leverage can increase return on equity, but it is something to be aware of. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risks reside on the balance sheet, far from it. For example, we found 3 warning signs for Alliance Data Systems (2 are a little nasty!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

In the end, it’s often best to focus on companies that aren’t in debt. You can access our special list of these companies (all with a track record of earnings growth). It’s free.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Is Elegance Optical International Holdings (HKG:907) a risky investment? https://freebassuk.com/is-elegance-optical-international-holdings-hkg907-a-risky-investment/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 22:47:31 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/is-elegance-optical-international-holdings-hkg907-a-risky-investment/ Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger-backed outside fund manager Li Lu is quick to say, “The biggest risk in investing isn’t price volatility, but whether you’re going to suffer a permanent loss of capital “. So it seems smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor when […]]]>

Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger-backed outside fund manager Li Lu is quick to say, “The biggest risk in investing isn’t price volatility, but whether you’re going to suffer a permanent loss of capital “. So it seems smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor when you’re assessing a company’s risk. Like many other companies Elegance Optical International Holdings Limited (HKG:907) uses debt. But does this debt worry shareholders?

Why is debt risky?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily meet those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company cannot meet its legal debt repayment obligations, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is when a company has to dilute shareholders at a cheap share price just to keep debt under control. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, especially capital-intensive businesses. When we look at debt levels, we first consider cash and debt levels, together.

Check out our latest analysis for Elegance Optical International Holdings

What is the net debt of Elegance Optical International Holdings?

As you can see below, at the end of September 2021, Elegance Optical International Holdings had a debt of HK$38.0 million, compared to HK$28.9 million a year ago. Click on the image for more details. But on the other hand, it also has HK$100.0 million in cash, resulting in a net cash position of HK$62.1 million.

SEHK: 907 Historical Debt to Equity February 3, 2022

How healthy is Elegance Optical International Holdings’ balance sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Elegance Optical International Holdings had liabilities of HK$81.3 million due within the year, and liabilities of HK$35.4 million falling due thereafter. As compensation for these obligations, it had cash of HK$100.0 million and receivables valued at HK$16.4 million due within 12 months. These liquid assets therefore roughly correspond to the total liabilities.

Given the size of Elegance Optical International Holdings, it appears that its cash is well balanced against its total liabilities. It is therefore very unlikely that the HK$462.6 million company will run out of cash, but it is still worth keeping an eye on the balance sheet. Despite its notable liabilities, Elegance Optical International Holdings has net cash, so it’s fair to say that it doesn’t have heavy debt! There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is the profits of Elegance Optical International Holdings that will influence the balance sheet in the future. So, when considering debt, it is definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive preview.

Last year, Elegance Optical International Holdings recorded a loss before interest and tax and actually reduced its revenue by 29% to HK$45 million. To be honest, that doesn’t bode well.

So how risky is Elegance Optical International Holdings?

By their very nature, companies that lose money are riskier than those with a long history of profitability. And over the past year, Elegance Optical International Holdings has posted a loss in earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), if truth be told. And during the same period, it recorded a negative free cash outflow of HK$87 million and recorded a book loss of HK$76 million. Given that it only has net cash of HK$62.1 million, the company may need to raise more capital if it does not break even soon. In summary, we are a little skeptical of this one, as it looks quite risky in the absence of free cash flow. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when analyzing debt. However, not all investment risks reside on the balance sheet, far from it. To do this, you need to find out about the 5 warning signs we spotted with Elegance Optical International Holdings (including 2 that don’t suit us too much).

If you are interested in investing in businesses that can generate profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing companies that have net cash on the balance sheet.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Myer Holdings (ASX:MYR) seems to be using debt quite wisely https://freebassuk.com/myer-holdings-asxmyr-seems-to-be-using-debt-quite-wisely/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 23:29:16 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/myer-holdings-asxmyr-seems-to-be-using-debt-quite-wisely/ Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett said “volatility is far from synonymous with risk.” When we think of a company’s risk, we always like to look at its use of debt, because over-indebtedness can lead to ruin. We can see that […]]]>

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett said “volatility is far from synonymous with risk.” When we think of a company’s risk, we always like to look at its use of debt, because over-indebtedness can lead to ruin. We can see that Myer Holdings Limited (ASX:MYR) uses debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt makes the business risky.

When is debt dangerous?

Debt helps a business until the business struggles to pay it back, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Ultimately, if the company cannot meet its legal debt repayment obligations, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still costly) situation is when a company has to dilute shareholders at a cheap share price just to keep debt under control. Of course, many companies use debt to finance their growth, without any negative consequences. When we look at debt levels, we first consider cash and debt levels, together.

See our latest analysis for Myer Holdings

What is Myer Holdings’ net debt?

You can click on the chart below for historical figures, but it shows Myer Holdings had A$66.8 million in debt in July 2021, up from A$78.6 million a year earlier. But on the other hand, he also has A$178.6 million in cash, resulting in a net cash position of A$111.8 million.

ASX: MYR Debt to Equity January 29, 2022

How healthy is Myer Holdings’ balance sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Myer Holdings had liabilities of A$590.3 million due within 12 months and liabilities of A$1.65 billion due beyond. As compensation for these obligations, it had cash of A$178.6 million and receivables valued at A$16.0 million due within 12 months. Thus, its liabilities total A$2.05 billion more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit casts a shadow over the company of 349.0 million Australian dollars, like a colossus towering over mere mortals. We would therefore be watching his balance sheet closely, no doubt. After all, Myer Holdings would likely need a major recapitalization if it were to pay its creditors today. Given that Myer Holdings has more cash than debt, we’re pretty confident that it can manage its debt, despite having a lot of debt in total.

Notably, Myer Holdings’ EBIT launched higher than Elon Musk, gaining a whopping 145% from a year ago. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when analyzing debt. But ultimately, the company’s future profitability will decide whether Myer Holdings can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you are focused on the future, you can check out this free report showing analyst earnings forecast.

But our last consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; he needs cash. Myer Holdings may have net cash on the balance sheet, but it is always interesting to see how well the company converts its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) into free cash flow, as this will influence both its needs and its capacity. . to manage debt. Fortunately for all shareholders, Myer Holdings has actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT for the past three years. There’s nothing better than incoming money to stay in the good books of your lenders.

Summary

Although Myer Holdings’ balance sheet is not particularly strong, due to total liabilities, it is clearly positive to see that it has a net cash position of A$111.8 million. The icing on the cake was converting 146% of that EBIT into free cash flow, bringing in A$220 million. So we have no problem with Myer Holdings’ use of debt. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risks reside on the balance sheet, far from it. Be aware that Myer Holdings displays 2 warning signs in our investment analysis and 1 of them cannot be ignored…

Of course, if you’re the type of investor who prefers to buy stocks without the burden of debt, then feel free to check out our exclusive list of cash-efficient growth stocks today.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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Here’s Why Deutsche Telekom (ETR:DTE) Has Significant Leverage https://freebassuk.com/heres-why-deutsche-telekom-etrdte-has-significant-leverage/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 06:58:36 +0000 https://freebassuk.com/heres-why-deutsche-telekom-etrdte-has-significant-leverage/ Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett said “volatility is far from synonymous with risk.” So it seems smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor when you’re assessing a company’s risk. […]]]>

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett said “volatility is far from synonymous with risk.” So it seems smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor when you’re assessing a company’s risk. We notice that Deutsche Telekom AG (ETR:DTE) has debt on its balance sheet. But the more important question is: what risk does this debt create?

What risk does debt carry?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is unable to repay its lenders, it exists at their mercy. If things go really bad, lenders can take over the business. Although not too common, we often see companies in debt permanently diluting their shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a ridiculous price. Of course, the advantage of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a business with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we look at debt levels, we first consider cash and debt levels, together.

Discover our latest analysis for Deutsche Telekom

What is Deutsche Telekom’s debt?

The graph below, which you can click on for more details, shows that Deutsche Telekom had a debt of 108.9 billion euros in September 2021; about the same as the previous year. However, he has €6.34 billion in cash that offsets this, resulting in a net debt of around €102.6 billion.

XTRA:DTE Debt to Equity January 23, 2022

How strong is Deutsche Telekom’s balance sheet?

According to the last published balance sheet, Deutsche Telekom had liabilities of 35.0 billion euros maturing within 12 months and liabilities of 159.5 billion euros maturing beyond 12 months. In return, it had 6.34 billion euros in cash and 16.4 billion euros in receivables due within 12 months. Thus, its liabilities total 171.8 billion euros more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit casts a shadow over the 76.3 billion euro company, like a colossus towering over mere mortals. So we definitely think shareholders need to watch this one closely. Ultimately, Deutsche Telekom would likely need a large recapitalization if its creditors demanded repayment.

In order to assess a company’s debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) divided by its expenses. interest (its interest coverage). In this way, we consider both the absolute amount of debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Deutsche Telekom has a debt to EBITDA ratio of 2.9 and its EBIT covered its interest charges 3.1 times. This suggests that while debt levels are significant, we will refrain from labeling them problematic. On a lighter note, Deutsche Telekom increased its EBIT by 20% last year. If he can sustain that kind of improvement, his debt will start to melt like glaciers in a warming world. When analyzing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious starting point. But ultimately, the company’s future profitability will decide whether Deutsche Telekom can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you are focused on the future, you can check out this free report showing analyst earnings forecast.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off its debts; book profits are not enough. We therefore always check how much of this EBIT is converted into free cash flow. Over the past three years, Deutsche Telekom’s free cash flow has been 50% of its EBIT, less than expected. That’s not great when it comes to paying off debt.

Our point of view

Reflecting on Deutsche Telekom’s attempt to stay on top of its total liabilities, we are certainly not enthusiastic. But on the bright side, its EBIT growth rate is a good sign and makes us more optimistic. Looking at the big picture, it seems clear to us that Deutsche Telekom’s use of debt creates risks for the company. If all goes well, it can pay off, but the downside of this debt is a greater risk of permanent losses. There is no doubt that we learn the most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risks reside on the balance sheet, far from it. To this end, you should be aware of the 2 warning signs we spotted with Deutsche Telekom.

If, after all that, you’re more interested in a fast-growing company with a strong balance sheet, check out our list of cash-flowing growth stocks without further ado.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell stocks and does not take into account your objectives or financial situation. Our goal is to bring you targeted long-term analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price-sensitive companies or qualitative materials. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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